History of Buddhism

Most people have a belief that there is something waiting for them in the afterlife if they lead a good life. It is a hope that there is something beyond death, a place that is a reward for a lifetime of good deeds and being mindful of the rules of that religion.

 

 

In most religions, there is also a messenger that holds the key to eternity and peace. This messenger for Christians is Jesus Christ, for Muslims it is Muhammad and for Buddhists it is Buddha. If you are unfamiliar with the history of Buddhism, then it is time you become acquainted with this religion.

 

The history of Buddhism started a very long time ago. It all begins with a prince named Siddhartha who decided to do something about the pain and suffering he saw in his fellow man. Siddhartha was given the Four Sights. He observed an elderly man, a diseased man, a corpse and a holy man. These encounters showed him the extent of human suffering. His goal was to try to eradicate these needless, painful experiences.

 

The Buddhist studies teach that Siddhartha went on a meditation retreat that lasted for forty-nine days. During this time he meditated on how human suffering was affecting him and everyone else. When he emerged from this meditation retreat he shared his enlightenment with the rest of the world. The answer to him was that material possessions caused people to suffer.

 

There was no point in holding onto material goods when in the end they decayed and you could not take them with you. The way to end this suffering and to finally find the universal knowledge was through Buddhist meditation and chants.

 

Many things have changed since Siddhartha became the Buddha and began to spread his word. Since that time many of his mantras, or teachings, have been taken in different directions by various sects, such as those practiced by the Zen Buddhist, the Tibetan Buddhist and the Buddhism Nichiren, which were founded after Buddha’s death. Different monks chose different mantras to teach Buddha’s followers. Just as Christianity has many different offshoots, so does Buddhism.

 

There is obviously quite a lot more to the history of Buddhism than just what is written here. It is an entire lifestyle devoted to reaching a goal of enlightenment. There are different chants to use while meditating, as well as different postures to assume. Is it complicated to learn?